volition

caelas:

saying feminism is unnecessary because you don’t feel oppressed is like saying fire extinguishers are unnecessary because your house isn’t on fire

gaystray:

do you ever just smell an old perfume, or hear an old song, or pass an old hangout spot and kinda break inside for a couple minutes

kittison:

A collection of nature-inspired tattoos.

What if you don’t complete the person that completes you?
— 23:04  (via lucreza)

f0xyshy:

If Linkin Park plays in the forest and no one is around to hear it, in the end, does it even matter?

thepostmodernpottercompendium:

The Winter Order
In the northern reaches of the world, where dark and light merge together, all forms of magic are relative, the mystic and the real are blurred and wizards and witches are not afraid to ask the question why, every year they pick two young children; a young wizard and a young witch who watch the world and think and then ask the question: why expend meaningless force?
For this is the beginning of the Greater Question: why send our men to the slaughter when we can allow General Winter and General Mud to do our work for us?
They are both the first and the last line of defense. When all else fails; when faced with a foe too great to surmount by brute force, bravery and honour alone; that is when the owls are sent out to those closest to the front lines, bearing notes with just three words written on them:
Burn, retreat, freeze.
It is their clarion call.
When the enemy crosses into their land, they find nothing but smouldering fields and maybe the odd Ashwinder’s egg here and there. There is nothing but eerie silence: empty homes, not a soul to be seen or heard, only the sound of the wind whistling through the bare branches of trees. 
It is this wind which will be their bane, dogging their footsteps as they march through silent fields with skeletal trees waving gently at them. For it is this same wind which brings bad news: rain and sleet, snow and frost. Rain and sleet to make their march harder - to trap their horses, their wagons, their tanks. Snow and frost to weaken them and bring them to a stop as the sleet and the mud trapped in their boots and in their wheels freezes solid.
They fight, on a battlefield of the Motherland’s choosing, but they would much rather go home. And when they finally turn their backs for home, they are reminded just how bitter winters in Russia can get. For the Winter Order has but one purpose, one thing they live for: to protect Mother Russia. And when invaders cross into Russia, seeking to harm their land, their mother, they rise up and send her wrath against her enemies - fire, mud and snow.
For they are hers and she is theirs and as long as she lives, so will they.
(Pics: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)

thepostmodernpottercompendium:

The Winter Order

In the northern reaches of the world, where dark and light merge together, all forms of magic are relative, the mystic and the real are blurred and wizards and witches are not afraid to ask the question why, every year they pick two young children; a young wizard and a young witch who watch the world and think and then ask the question: why expend meaningless force?

For this is the beginning of the Greater Question: why send our men to the slaughter when we can allow General Winter and General Mud to do our work for us?

They are both the first and the last line of defense. When all else fails; when faced with a foe too great to surmount by brute force, bravery and honour alone; that is when the owls are sent out to those closest to the front lines, bearing notes with just three words written on them:

Burn, retreat, freeze.

It is their clarion call.

When the enemy crosses into their land, they find nothing but smouldering fields and maybe the odd Ashwinder’s egg here and there. There is nothing but eerie silence: empty homes, not a soul to be seen or heard, only the sound of the wind whistling through the bare branches of trees. 

It is this wind which will be their bane, dogging their footsteps as they march through silent fields with skeletal trees waving gently at them. For it is this same wind which brings bad news: rain and sleet, snow and frost. Rain and sleet to make their march harder - to trap their horses, their wagons, their tanks. Snow and frost to weaken them and bring them to a stop as the sleet and the mud trapped in their boots and in their wheels freezes solid.

They fight, on a battlefield of the Motherland’s choosing, but they would much rather go home. And when they finally turn their backs for home, they are reminded just how bitter winters in Russia can get. For the Winter Order has but one purpose, one thing they live for: to protect Mother Russia. And when invaders cross into Russia, seeking to harm their land, their mother, they rise up and send her wrath against her enemies - fire, mud and snow.

For they are hers and she is theirs and as long as she lives, so will they.

(Pics: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)

wholewheat3:

When I was 6 my brother told me that old people sag because they’re being pulled to hell and I cried

Steve, Peggy and Bucky - Then and Now

herriestiles:

shelterfromcold:

two deer walk out of a gay bar, one turns to the other and says “man, i can’t believe i blew thirty bucks in there”.

this literally took me forever to get


Bindi can usually be described as a traditional red circular mark or dot worn by the Indian women on their forehead. When this is accompanied by a vermillion mark on the parting of hair just above the forehead, it indicates that the particular lady is married. The term ‘bindi’ is derived from the Sanskrit word ‘bindu’ meaning “a drop or a small dot or particle”. Even though traditionally, bindi is a red colored dot, it can be worn in other colors also, like yellow, orange and so on. The shape and size of the bindi can also vary. Conventionally, it’s the Hindu married women who wear bindi. But, this mark can have several meanings and so, you may also see unmarried girls and even children wearing it. It’s the occasion, the color of the bindi and its shape that determines what it denotes. The customary bindi is made with red sindoor powder. The bindi is called the tilak when it’s applied on the forehead of a person, at the conclusion of a religious function or havan. The purpose of wearing a bindi can also vary. If it covers the entire forehead in three horizontal lines, then it denotes the wearer is an ascetic or belongs to a particular sect (like Brahmin). Sometimes, the bindi is used for mere beautification purpose by females. In this case, you may also find her wearing a small jewelry instead of the typical red dot. Though in India, a widow cannot wear a vermillion, she is free to sport a bindi. Bindi is called by different names in different languages of India. Thus, alternative names for bindi is Pottu in Tamil and Malayalam, Tilak in Hindi, Bottu or Tilakam in Telugu, Bottu or Tilaka in Kannada and Teep meaning “a pressing” in Bengali. Sometimes, the terms sindoor, kumkum, or kasturi are used depending upon the ingredients used in making the Bindi mark.
source

Bindi can usually be described as a traditional red circular mark or dot worn by the Indian women on their forehead. When this is accompanied by a vermillion mark on the parting of hair just above the forehead, it indicates that the particular lady is married. The term ‘bindi’ is derived from the Sanskrit word ‘bindu’ meaning “a drop or a small dot or particle”. Even though traditionally, bindi is a red colored dot, it can be worn in other colors also, like yellow, orange and so on. The shape and size of the bindi can also vary.

Conventionally, it’s the Hindu married women who wear bindi. But, this mark can have several meanings and so, you may also see unmarried girls and even children wearing it. It’s the occasion, the color of the bindi and its shape that determines what it denotes. The customary bindi is made with red sindoor powder. The bindi is called the tilak when it’s applied on the forehead of a person, at the conclusion of a religious function or havan.

The purpose of wearing a bindi can also vary. If it covers the entire forehead in three horizontal lines, then it denotes the wearer is an ascetic or belongs to a particular sect (like Brahmin). Sometimes, the bindi is used for mere beautification purpose by females. In this case, you may also find her wearing a small jewelry instead of the typical red dot. Though in India, a widow cannot wear a vermillion, she is free to sport a bindi.

Bindi is called by different names in different languages of India. Thus, alternative names for bindi is Pottu in Tamil and Malayalam, Tilak in Hindi, Bottu or Tilakam in Telugu, Bottu or Tilaka in Kannada and Teep meaning “a pressing” in Bengali. Sometimes, the terms sindoor, kumkum, or kasturi are used depending upon the ingredients used in making the Bindi mark.

source

nevver:

Brussels

soul-assassins:

😂😂

soul-assassins:

😂😂